White Trash

Filename: white-trash.pdf
ISBN: 9781786492999
Release Date: 2017-01-05
Number of pages:
Author: Nancy Isenberg
Publisher: Atlantic Books

Download and read online White Trash in PDF and EPUB In this landmark book, Nancy Isenberg argues that the voters who boosted Trump all the way to the White House have been a permanent part of the American fabric, and reveals how the wretched and landless poor have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlements to today's hillbillies. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. Reconstruction pitted white trash against newly freed slaves, which factored in the rise of eugenics - a widely popular movement embraced by Theodore Roosevelt that targeted poor whites for sterilization. These poor were at the heart of New Deal reforms and Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society; they are now offered up as entertainment in reality TV shows, and the label is applied to celebrities ranging from Dolly Parton to Bill Clinton. Marginalized as a class, white trash have always been at or near the centre of major political debates over the character of the American identity. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over four hundred years, Isenberg upends assumptions about America's supposedly class-free society - where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility - and forces a nation to face the truth about the enduring, malevolent nature of class.


White Trash

Filename: white-trash.pdf
ISBN: 9781101608487
Release Date: 2016-06-21
Number of pages: 480
Author: Nancy Isenberg
Publisher: Penguin

Download and read online White Trash in PDF and EPUB The New York Times bestseller A New York Times Notable and Critics’ Top Book of 2016 Longlisted for the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction One of NPR's 10 Best Books Of 2016 Faced Tough Topics Head On NPR's Book Concierge Guide To 2016’s Great Reads San Francisco Chronicle's Best of 2016: 100 recommended books A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of 2016 Globe & Mail 100 Best of 2016 “Formidable and truth-dealing . . . necessary.” —The New York Times “This eye-opening investigation into our country’s entrenched social hierarchy is acutely relevant.” —O Magazine In her groundbreaking bestselling history of the class system in America, Nancy Isenberg upends history as we know it by taking on our comforting myths about equality and uncovering the crucial legacy of the ever-present, always embarrassing—if occasionally entertaining—poor white trash. “When you turn an election into a three-ring circus, there’s always a chance that the dancing bear will win,” says Isenberg of the political climate surrounding Sarah Palin. And we recognize how right she is today. Yet the voters who boosted Trump all the way to the White House have been a permanent part of our American fabric, argues Isenberg. The wretched and landless poor have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement to today's hillbillies. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over four hundred years, Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. Reconstruction pitted poor white trash against newly freed slaves, which factored in the rise of eugenics–-a widely popular movement embraced by Theodore Roosevelt that targeted poor whites for sterilization. These poor were at the heart of New Deal reforms and LBJ’s Great Society; they haunt us in reality TV shows like Here Comes Honey Boo Boo and Duck Dynasty. Marginalized as a class, white trash have always been at or near the center of major political debates over the character of the American identity. We acknowledge racial injustice as an ugly stain on our nation’s history. With Isenberg’s landmark book, we will have to face the truth about the enduring, malevolent nature of class as well.


White Trash

Filename: white-trash.pdf
ISBN: 9780670785971
Release Date: 2016
Number of pages: 480
Author: Nancy Isenberg
Publisher: Penguin

Download and read online White Trash in PDF and EPUB "A history of the class system in America from the colonial era to the present illuminates the crucial legacy of the underprivileged white demographic, citing the pivotal contributions of lower-class white workers in wartime, social policy, and the rise of the Republican Party"--NoveList.


Fallen Founder

Filename: fallen-founder.pdf
ISBN: 110120236X
Release Date: 2007-05-10
Number of pages: 560
Author: Nancy Isenberg
Publisher: Penguin

Download and read online Fallen Founder in PDF and EPUB From the author of White Trash, a controversial challenge to the views of the Founding Fathers offered by Ron Chernow and David McCullough Lin-Manuel Miranda's play "Hamilton" has reignited interest in the founding fathers; and it features Aaron Burr among its vibrant cast of characters. With Fallen Founder, Nancy Isenberg plumbs rare and obscure sources to shed new light on everyone's favorite founding villain. The Aaron Burr whom we meet through Isenberg's eye-opening biography is a feminist, an Enlightenment figure on par with Jefferson, a patriot, and—most importantly—a man with powerful enemies in an age of vitriolic political fighting. Revealing the gritty reality of eighteenth-century America, Fallen Founder is the authoritative restoration of a figure who ran afoul of history and a much-needed antidote to the hagiography of the revolutionary era.


Poor White

Filename: poor-white.pdf
ISBN: 1535129093
Release Date: 2016-07-30
Number of pages: 224
Author: Sherwood Anderson
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

Download and read online Poor White in PDF and EPUB Anderson's Poor White, apart from a wonderful story of a poor young white man's struggle to adopt to the times and deal with the internal war raging inside him, remains an amazing depiction of the struggle of all Americans to adjust to the demands and pressures brought on by the Age of Mechanization. It is a powerful narrative about an age under assault by modern industrialization and technological innovation. Anyone who wishes to know about this dynamic time in American history, should definitely read this exciting work. Now some words about this particular edition of Poor White. One central aim of this edition was to provide a more readable text with larger fonts and fewer errors than the original publication. The earlier edition contains many formatting errors, typos, slips of the pen, and misspellings. That being said, many punctuation infelicities, as well as grammatical quirks, which the editor felt uncomfortable in addressing, remain. This special edition of Poor White also includes various photos and illustrations from the era in which the novel was written. They offer the reader vivid snapshots of a period of transition that brought about changes Anderson saw as a threat to old established ways of life. Certainly his writing captures the era superbly, and thus it was not the editor's intent to provide photos corresponding exactly to the characters, towns, cities, and landscapes Anderson so artfully depicted in his work. The purpose of the photos and illustrations is to provide additional historical background and detail about life lived more than a hundred years ago. For this reason, the editor has carefully chosen photos and illustrations that include, but do not extend beyond, the period in which Poor White was published.


White Rage

Filename: white-rage.pdf
ISBN: 9781632864147
Release Date: 2016-05-31
Number of pages: 256
Author: Carol Anderson, Ph.D.
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

Download and read online White Rage in PDF and EPUB National Book Critics Circle Award Winner New York Times Bestseller A New York Times Notable Book of the Year A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year A Boston Globe Best Book of 2016 A Chicago Review of Books Best Nonfiction Book of 2016 From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America. As Ferguson, Missouri, erupted in August 2014, and media commentators across the ideological spectrum referred to the angry response of African Americans as "black rage,Â?? historian Carol Anderson wrote a remarkable op-ed in The Washington Post suggesting that this was, instead, "white rage at work. With so much attention on the flames," she argued, "everyone had ignored the kindling." Since 1865 and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, every time African Americans have made advances towards full participation in our democracy, white reaction has fueled a deliberate and relentless rollback of their gains. The end of the Civil War and Reconstruction was greeted with the Black Codes and Jim Crow; the Supreme Court's landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision was met with the shutting down of public schools throughout the South while taxpayer dollars financed segregated white private schools; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 triggered a coded but powerful response, the so-called Southern Strategy and the War on Drugs that disenfranchised millions of African Americans while propelling presidents Nixon and Reagan into the White House, and then the election of America's first black President, led to the expression of white rage that has been as relentless as it has been brutal. Carefully linking these and other historical flashpoints when social progress for African Americans was countered by deliberate and cleverly crafted opposition, Anderson pulls back the veil that has long covered actions made in the name of protecting democracy, fiscal responsibility, or protection against fraud, rendering visible the long lineage of white rage. Compelling and dramatic in the unimpeachable history it relates, White Rage will add an important new dimension to the national conversation about race in America.


Summary and Analysis of White Trash The 400 Year Untold History of Class in America

Filename: summary-and-analysis-of-white-trash-the-400-year-untold-history-of-class-in-america.pdf
ISBN: 9781504044875
Release Date: 2017-04-11
Number of pages: 30
Author: Worth Books
Publisher: Open Road Media

Download and read online Summary and Analysis of White Trash The 400 Year Untold History of Class in America in PDF and EPUB So much to read, so little time? This brief overview of White Trash tells you what you need to know—before or after you read Nancy Isenberg’s book. Crafted and edited with care, Worth Books set the standard for quality and give you the tools you need to be a well-informed reader. This short summary and analysis of White Trash includes: Historical context Chapter-by-chapter overviews Profiles of the main characters Detailed timeline of events Important quotes Fascinating trivia Glossary of terms Supporting material to enhance your understanding of the original work About White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America by Nancy Isenberg: In her New York Times–bestselling book White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg explores the role of poor, rural whites—white trash—in US culture and politics. Throughout its history, America has prided itself on the American Dream, where a person, regardless of class, can be whomever they want. But is social mobility a true ingredient of US society, or is it just American idealism at its best? Isenberg suggests the latter as she traces the history of the country from the first English settlements, through the Civil War, and up to present-day pop culture, examining the origins of the language and attitudes that have defined poor, white Americans for centuries. As Donald Trump moved in to the White House thanks, in part, to a vocal contingent of poor, white supporters, White Trash’s detailed history offers insight to how the new president curried the favor of this large, often overlooked population, and how they might fare under his leadership. The summary and analysis in this ebook are intended to complement your reading experience and bring you closer to a great work of nonfiction.


City of Dreams

Filename: city-of-dreams.pdf
ISBN: 9780544103856
Release Date: 2016-10-18
Number of pages: 768
Author: Tyler Anbinder
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Download and read online City of Dreams in PDF and EPUB A defining American story of millions of immigrants, hundreds of languages, and one great city New York has been America's city of immigrants for nearly four centuries. Growing from Peter Minuit's tiny settlement of 1626 to one with more than three million immigrants today, the city has always been a magnet for transplants from all over the globe. It is only fitting that the United States, a "nation of immigrants," is home to the only world city built primarily by immigration. More immigrants have entered the United States through New York than through all other entry points combined, making New York's immigrant saga a quintessentially American story. City of Dreams is the long-overdue, inspiring, and defining account of New York's both famous and forgotten immigrants: the young man from the Caribbean who relocated to New York and became a Founding Father; an Italian immigrant who toiled for years at railroad track maintenance before achieving his dream of becoming a nationally renowned poet; Russian-born Emma Goldman, who condoned the murder of American industrialists as a means of aiding downtrodden workers; Dominican immigrant Oscar de la Renta, who dressed first ladies from Jackie Kennedy to Michelle Obama. Over ten years in the making, Tyler Anbinder's story is one of innovators and artists, revolutionaries and rioters, staggering deprivation and soaring triumphs. Today's immigrants are really no different from those who have come to America in centuries past—and their story has never before been told with such breadth of scope, lavish research, and resounding spirit.


Not Quite White

Filename: not-quite-white.pdf
ISBN: 9780822388593
Release Date: 2006-10-13
Number of pages: 228
Author: Matt Wray
Publisher: Duke University Press

Download and read online Not Quite White in PDF and EPUB White trash. The phrase conjures up images of dirty rural folk who are poor, ignorant, violent, and incestuous. But where did this stigmatizing phrase come from? And why do these stereotypes persist? Matt Wray answers these and other questions by delving into the long history behind this term of abuse and others like it. Ranging from the early 1700s to the early 1900s, Not Quite White documents the origins and transformations of the multiple meanings projected onto poor rural whites in the United States. Wray draws on a wide variety of primary sources—literary texts, folklore, diaries and journals, medical and scientific articles, social scientific analyses—to construct a dense archive of changing collective representations of poor whites. Of crucial importance are the ideas about poor whites that circulated through early-twentieth-century public health campaigns, such as hookworm eradication and eugenic reforms. In these crusades, impoverished whites, particularly but not exclusively in the American South, were targeted for interventions by sanitarians who viewed them as “filthy, lazy crackers” in need of racial uplift and by eugenicists who viewed them as a “feebleminded menace” to the white race, threats that needed to be confined and involuntarily sterilized. Part historical inquiry and part sociological investigation, Not Quite White demonstrates the power of social categories and boundaries to shape social relationships and institutions, to invent groups where none exist, and to influence policies and legislation that end up harming the very people they aim to help. It illuminates not only the cultural significance and consequences of poor white stereotypes but also how dominant whites exploited and expanded these stereotypes to bolster and defend their own fragile claims to whiteness.


White Trash

Filename: white-trash.pdf
ISBN: 9781135204488
Release Date: 2013-09-13
Number of pages: 288
Author: Annalee Newitz
Publisher: Routledge

Download and read online White Trash in PDF and EPUB First published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.


The Poverty Industry

Filename: the-poverty-industry.pdf
ISBN: 9781479863112
Release Date: 2016-06-21
Number of pages: 288
Author: Daniel L. Hatcher
Publisher: NYU Press

Download and read online The Poverty Industry in PDF and EPUB Government aid doesn’t always go where it’s supposed to. Foster care agencies team up with companies to take disability and survivor benefits from abused and neglected children. States and their revenue consultants use illusory schemes to siphon Medicaid funds intended for children and the poor into general state coffers. Child support payments for foster children and families on public assistance are converted into government revenue. And the poverty industry keeps expanding, leaving us with nursing homes and juvenile detention centers that sedate residents to reduce costs and maximize profit, local governments buying nursing homes to take the facilities’ federal aid while the elderly languish with poor care, and counties hiring companies to mine the poor for additional funds in modern day debtor’s prisons. In The Poverty Industry, Daniel L. Hatcher shows us how state governments and their private industry partners are profiting from the social safety net, turning America’s most vulnerable populations into sources of revenue. The poverty industry is stealing billions in federal aid and other funds from impoverished families, abused and neglected children, and the disabled and elderly poor. As policy experts across the political spectrum debate how to best structure government assistance programs, a massive siphoning of the safety net is occurring behind the scenes.In the face of these abuses of power, Hatcher offers a road map for reforms to realign the practices of human service agencies with their intended purpose, to prevent the misuse of public taxpayer dollars, and to ensure that government aid truly gets to those in need.


Madison and Jefferson

Filename: madison-and-jefferson.pdf
ISBN: 9780812979008
Release Date: 2013-01-15
Number of pages: 808
Author: Andrew Burstein
Publisher: Random House Incorporated

Download and read online Madison and Jefferson in PDF and EPUB A provocative analysis of the historically pivotal friendship between the third and fourth presidents offers insight into their complex characters while presenting a sobering assessment of how politics were conducted in the country's early years.


Reading Classes

Filename: reading-classes.pdf
ISBN: 9780801464522
Release Date: 2012-05-08
Number of pages: 264
Author: Barbara Jensen
Publisher: Cornell University Press

Download and read online Reading Classes in PDF and EPUB Discussions of class make many Americans uncomfortable. This accessible book makes class visible in everyday life. Solely identifying political and economic inequalities between classes offers an incomplete picture of class dynamics in America, and may not connect with people's lived experiences. In Reading Classes, Barbara Jensen explores the anguish caused by class in our society, identifying classism-or anti-working class prejudice-as a central factor in the reproduction of inequality in America. Giving voice to the experiences and inner lives of working-class people, Jensen-a community and counseling psychologist-provides an in-depth, psychologically informed examination of how class in America is created and re-created through culture, with an emphasis on how working- and middle-class cultures differ and conflict. This book is unique in its claim that working-class cultures have positive qualities that serve to keep members within them, and that can haunt those who leave them behind. Through both autobiographical reflections on her dual citizenship in the working class and middle class and the life stories of students, clients, and relatives, Jensen brings into focus the clash between the realities of working-class life and middle-class expectations for working-class people. Focusing on education, she finds that at every point in their personal development and educational history, working-class children are misunderstood, ignored, or disrespected by middle-class teachers and administrators. Education, while often hailed as a way to "cross classes," brings with it its own set of conflicts and internal struggles. These problems can lead to a divided self, resulting in alienation and suffering for the upwardly mobile student. Jensen suggests how to increase awareness of the value of working-class cultures to a truly inclusive American society at personal, professional, and societal levels.


Blood at the Root A Racial Cleansing in America

Filename: blood-at-the-root-a-racial-cleansing-in-america.pdf
ISBN: 9780393293029
Release Date: 2016-09-20
Number of pages: 304
Author: Patrick Phillips
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

Download and read online Blood at the Root A Racial Cleansing in America in PDF and EPUB A gripping tale of racial cleansing in Forsyth County, Georgia, and a harrowing testament to the deep roots of racial violence in America. Forsyth County, Georgia, at the turn of the twentieth century was home to a large African American community that included ministers and teachers, farmers and field hands, tradesmen, servants, and children. Many black residents were poor sharecroppers, but others owned their own farms and the land on which they’d founded the county’s thriving black churches. But then in September of 1912, three young black laborers were accused of raping and murdering a white girl. One man was dragged from a jail cell and lynched on the town square, two teenagers were hung after a one-day trial, and soon bands of white “night riders” launched a coordinated campaign of arson and terror, driving all 1,098 black citizens out of the county. In the wake of the expulsions, whites harvested the crops and took over the livestock of their former neighbors, and quietly laid claim to “abandoned” land. The charred ruins of homes and churches disappeared into the weeds, until the people and places of black Forsyth were forgotten. National Book Award finalist Patrick Phillips tells Forsyth’s tragic story in vivid detail and traces its long history of racial violence all the way back to antebellum Georgia. Recalling his own childhood in the 1970s and ’80s, Phillips sheds light on the communal crimes of his hometown and the violent means by which locals kept Forsyth “all white” well into the 1990s. Blood at the Root is a sweeping American tale that spans the Cherokee removals of the 1830s, the hope and promise of Reconstruction, and the crushing injustice of Forsyth’s racial cleansing. With bold storytelling and lyrical prose, Phillips breaks a century-long silence and uncovers a history of racial terrorism that continues to shape America in the twenty-first century.


Hillbilly Elegy

Filename: hillbilly-elegy.pdf
ISBN: 9780062300560
Release Date: 2016-06-28
Number of pages: 272
Author: J. D. Vance
Publisher: HarperCollins

Download and read online Hillbilly Elegy in PDF and EPUB NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER "A riveting book."—The Wall Street Journal "Essential reading."—David Brooks, New York Times From a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a powerful account of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over forty years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck. The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually their grandchild (the author) would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of their success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that this is only the short, superficial version. Vance’s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother, struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, and were never able to fully escape the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. Vance piercingly shows how he himself still carries around the demons of their chaotic family history. A deeply moving memoir with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.